Aids And Drug Abuse


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Aids And Drug Abuse

 

The two groups at greatest risk for AIDS are homosexual or bisexual men
and people who shoot drugs. People who use needles to inject drugs (including
mainlines and skin poppers) get the virus by sharing their works with other
users who already have the AIDS virus in their blood.

You can't always tell who is infected with the AIDS virus. Most people
actually carrying the virus don't look any different than anybody else, they
look and feel well, but they can still spread the disease. Symptoms of AIDS
may not show up for many years and some remain without symptoms even then.
Thousands of IV drug abusers already have AIDS, and many thousands more are
carriers of the virus.

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a serious condition that
affects the body's ability to fight off infection. A diagnosis of AIDS is
made when a person develops some form of life-threatening illness not usually
found in a person with a normal ability to fight infection. To date more that
fifty percent of all the persons with AIDS have died.

Shooting drugs has now been determined to be one of the biggest
problems facing America today. While the homosexual community has put on a
media campaign alerting and educating the public about the dangers of AIDS,
nothing is being done to stop the widespread sharing of needles among drug
users.

Remember, if you shoot drugs, you are in danger of catching AIDS. The
best advice for protecting yourself and people you love is to stop shooting
drugs. It is also important to note that women who shoot drugs or who live
with men who shoot drugs sometimes gives AIDS to their babies, either before
or shortly after birth. Babies born with AIDS become ill very quickly.

Most individuals infected with the AIDS virus have no symptoms and feel
well for a long time before eventually developing such symptoms as fever and
night sweats, weight loss, swollen lymph glands in the neck, the underarms
and groin area, sever fatigue or tiredness, diarrhoea, white spots or unusual
blemishes in the mouth. These symptoms are also symptoms of a number of other
illnesses and that should be taken into consideration. Anyone with any of
these symptoms for more than two weeks should not panic buy should consult
their doctor.

The AIDS virus is not spread through normal daily contact at work, school
or home. There have been no cases found where the virus has been transmitted
by casual contact with AIDS patients in the home, work place, or health care
setting.

There is an antibody test that detects antibodies to the AIDS virus
that causes the disease. The body produces antibodies that try to get rid of
bacteria, viruses, or anything else that is not supposed to be in the
bloodstream. The test may show if someone has been infected with the AIDS
virus. While the testing procedure is considered accurate, it does not tell
who will develop full-blown AIDS.





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